‘Ello guv’nor, I heard you sold your kid for WiFi. Perhaps I could interest you in another good deal? It’s called tech for privacy and I know you’re gonna luv it.

Having decided to pass on the logical numbering of the next rendition of Windows, Microsoft’s new operating system will be called Windows 10.

In a move many see as an attempt to put the memory of the not-so-popular Windows 8 behind it, the company is all steam ahead as it marches toward the inevitable retail release of its replacement.

In the meantime, however, early adopters can grab a technical preview to see how Redmond has accommodated Start button-loving fans of its arguably much better Windows 7.

Being one of the first people to get your hands on a new operating system may sound pretty cool but that will only be the case if you read the privacy policy first (something you should always do before installing new software).

Why?

Because Microsoft sharing the tech preview with you is a reciprocal agreement which sees your data travel back in the opposite direction.

Specifically, the Windows Insider Programme policy says,

“Microsoft collects information about you, your devices, applications and networks, and your use of those devices, applications and networks. Examples of data we collect include your name, email address, preferences and interests; browsing, search and file history; phone call and SMS data; device configuration and sensor data; and application usage.”

While the sheer volume of collectible data is staggering and far beyond what I for one would be happy to give up if I had a choice, it is standard fare these days, mores the pity.

More disconcerting though are these two following entries:

“We may collect information about your device and applications and use it for purposes such as determining or improving compatibility” and “use voice input features like speech-to-text, we may collect voice information and use it for purposes such as improving speech processing.”

and

“If you open a file, we may collect information about the file, the application used to open the file, and how long it takes any use [of] it for purposes such as improving performance, or [if you] enter text, we may collect typed characters, we may collect typed characters and use them for purposes such as improving autocomplete and spellcheck features.”

Did that sink in?

If not read it again and you will see that signing up for the Windows 10 preview will see you giving Microsoft permission to both record your voice and, specifically what you say, and to collect everything you type on your keyboard.

In other words, you will be voluntarily installing voice and keyloggers onto any system running this version of Windows.

Ouch!

There is no word on whether the privacy policy will be similarly worded when bundled with the final version and I suspect, and hope, that it won’t – I’d like to think that Microsoft is merely gathering so much data to help it make improvements to the new operating system before its retail release.

But there are no guarantees of anything these days, especially where technology is concerned and, likewise it seems, in the realm of data gathering.

So, my advice, is to research Windows 10 thoroughly upon its general release and to check out its privacy policy in its entirety before letting it anywhere near any of your devices.

Alas, most people will not do so though. After all, the latest tech is often so enticing that people will do the craziest things to get on the bandwagon.

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